Image courtesy of the Library of Congress
LAFFERTY, Abraham Walter (1875-1964)

LAFFERTY, ABRAHAM WALTER, a Representative from Oregon; born near Farber, Audrain County, Mo., June 10, 1875; attended the public schools; studied law at the University of Missouri at Columbia in 1895 and 1896; was admitted to the bar the latter year and commenced practice in Montgomery City, Mo.; prosecuting attorney of Montgomery County, Mo., 1902-1904; appointed special agent of the United States General Land Office and moved to Portland, Oreg., March 1, 1905; resigned October 1, 1906, and engaged in the practice of law in Portland; elected as a Republican to the Sixty-second and Sixty-third Congresses (March 4, 1911-March 3, 1915); unsuccessful candidate for reelection to the Sixty-fourth Congress; resumed the practice of law in Portland; during the First World War served as major at the San Francisco training camp; moved to New York City in 1919 and continued the practice of law there until 1933, when he moved to Riverdale, Md.; returned to Portland, Oreg., and was an unsuccessful candidate for nomination to the United States House of Representatives as an Independent in 1950 and as a Republican in 1952, 1954, and 1956; was a resident of Portland, Oreg., until his death January 15, 1964; interment in Fairmount Cemetery, Middletown, Mo.

Oregon Historical Society
Portland, OR
Papers: 1949-1991, .04 cubic foot (2 folders).
Collection includes letters to E. B. McNaughton, January 1949, urging Reed College to purchase Calvert Mansion in Riverdale, Maryland, with historical references to Jonathan Bourne and Edward D. Baker; miscellaneous documents, 1961-1963, regarding his problems with the I.R.S. and Oregon & California Railroad land claims; and correspondence between Norman Wiener and Dr. Thomas R. Montgomery, 1991, regarding Lafferty's I.R.S. and O&C troubles retrospectively.

Papers: In the papers of Oscar Peter Beck, ca. 1905-1950, 3 boxes.
Collection includes correspondence of Abraham Lafferty.


University of Oregon Library
Eugene, OR
Papers: In the Thomas Neuhausen papers, 1850-1936, 23 cubic feet.
Collection contains political correspondence. Neuhausen was leader of the Progressive Party in Oregon in 1912.